Professor Mark Brown

Day 1
h

Presentation Title

New Moves for New Times: Dancing Towards the Future

Speaker

Professor Mark Brown

Director, National Institute for Digital Learning

Time

9.15am

Location

AMDC301

Session Details

New Moves for New Times: Dancing Towards the Future

Why embrace change? Why do we need new teaching practices for new times? Are new models of online and blended learning really better than traditional methods of higher education? This keynote reflects on these questions and the fickle dance over many years between teaching and technology in promoting better educational outcomes. It describes some of the myths and ongoing debates confronting the future of higher education in the digital era and raises critical questions about the transformative potential of technology-enhanced models of teaching and learning. Framed by this critical perspective, and drawing on the contemporary research literature, the presentation then adopts the language of opportunity to challenge today’s educators to redesign the traditional curriculum through a blend of new pedagogies and new digital solutions to provide more engaging, innovative, and personalized learning experiences for 21st Century learners. Although there is no one dance or right solution as higher education is highly contextualized a number of models and frameworks are outlined to help scaffold the learning design process. Finally, we explore some of the challenges and opportunities facing teachers and educational institutions wishing to create a high quality rich online and blended learning culture as we dance towards an uncertain future.

About the Speaker

Professor Mark Brown is Director of the National Institute for Digital Learning (NIDL). Mark also helps to coordinate the Digital Learning Research Network which includes over 50 staff with a research interest, and broad range of scholarly outputs, in this area. More detailed biographical information, including a summary of Mark’s research outputs by year, is available from his NIDL webpage.

Professor Hamish Coates

Day 1
h

Presentation Title

Engaging Learners in Blended Higher Education

Speaker

Professor Hamish Coates

Professor of Higher Education Centre for the Study of Higher Education

University of Melbourne

Time

1.00pm

Location

AMDC301

Session Details

Engaging Learners in Blended Higher Education

As tertiary education becomes more blended student engagement is harder to take for granted, requiring more active leadership and management. This keynote shares insights on assessing and enhancing student engagement, drawing from 15 years working with hundreds of institutions. The presentation clarifies the concept, takes stock of prevailing contexts, looks at key research findings, and advances suggestions for engaging learners with blended higher education.

About the Speaker

Hamish Coates is a Professor of Higher Education at the Centre for the Study of Higher Education (CSHE), University of Melbourne. He was Founding Director of Higher Education Research at the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) from 2006 to 2013, and between 2010 and 2013 also Program Director at the LH Martin Institute for Tertiary Leadership and Management. With a background in psychometrics and political theory, Hamish completed his PhD in 2005 at the University of Melbourne, and subsequent executive training at INSEAD and MBS. Through research and development Hamish focuses on improving the quality and productivity of higher education. He has initiated and led many projects, including numerous national and international surveys. He was Founding International Director of OECD’s Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO).

http://melbourne-cshe.unimelb.edu.au/about/our-staff/hamish-coates

Professor Shane Dawson

Day 2
h

Presentation Title

Learning analytics: Over simplified and under used

Speaker

Professor Shane Dawson

Director of the Teaching Innovation Unit and Professor of Learning Analytics

University of South Australia

Time

10.30 am

Location

AMDC301

Session Details

Learning analytics: Over simplified and under used

The so-called digital revolution has vastly impacted upon and changed how industries such as publishing, banking, travel, media and communications, and retail operate. It is well anticipated that this trend for digital disruption will well continue into the future and expand across all sectors. Education is no exception. The ubiquitous adoption of learning technologies, personal and mobile devices provides for new modes of education delivery and increased opportunities for formal and informal collaborations. As teachers and students engage more with these tools we are seeing a parallel rise in research associated with learning analytics, data mining, and learning sciences. Learning analytics in particular has had strong resonance in the education sector (including teachers, students, policy-makers and administrators). As such, the field has been frequently touted as a potential “game changer” for education for its capacity to provide new insights into student learning progress. While there is much promise and numerous significant advancements in learning analytics research the hyperbole is not necessarily aligned to the reality of embedding such tools and resources within an organization. The extraction and merging of alternate student learning data sources as well as algorithmic development, sensemaking combined with the diversity of teaching approaches points to a complex system. As with other complex adaptive systems any anticipated impact will also result in numerous unanticipated changes. This presentation reflects on the noted promise of fields such as learning analytics and big data in terms of their capacity to deliver new forms of educational practice. That is, the rise and enculturation of data-informed learning and teaching, the provision of early alert systems, flexible and personalised learning opportunities enacted through recommender systems and the development of individualised learner profiles. The complexities of educational systems will be explored to better understand why learning analytics remains largely in the developmental phases and how these challenges can be addressed at a systemic sector-wide level.

About the Speaker

Dr. Shane Dawson is the Director of the Teaching Innovation Unit and Professor of Learning Analytics at the University of South Australia. Shane’s research focuses on the use of social network analysis and learner ICT interaction data to inform and benchmark teaching and learning quality. Shane is a founding executive member of the Society for Learning Analytics Research and past program and conference chair of the International Learning Analytics and Knowledge conference. He is a co-developer of numerous open source software including the Online Video Annotations for Learning (OVAL) and SNAPP a social network visualization tool designed for teaching staff to better understand, identify and evaluate student learning, engagement, academic performance and creative capacity.